George Steriopolus – Manx Loaghtan Produce – Manx Loaghtan Sheep

George Steriopolus – Manx Loaghtan Produce – Manx Loaghtan Sheep
George Steriopolus – Manx Loaghtan Produce – Manx Loaghtan Sheep

Slow Food UK is incredibly proud to have Ark of Taste producers like George Steriopulos from Manx Loaghtan Produce on board. Please read more about George and his forgotten food Manx Loaghtan lamb below. George is also part of our Supporters’ Scheme.

George is a Slow Meat producer.

How George got into rearing Man Loaghtan Sheep and why he chose this particular breed:
George has been rearing Manx Loaghtan sheep for about 30 years, and is showing no signs of slowing down. For George it is an honour to work with such an incredible breed of sheep, one which is unique to the Isle of Man. He goes to the extra length in preserving this wonderful breed and he knows better than anyone that the only way to do this is to convince people to start eating it. When he first noticed the Manx Loaghtan sheep he was immediately attracted to their majestic horns and  golden brown fleeces but as he began to rear them he also grew to love the unique and intense quality of the meat they produce. The welfare of his sheep is central to George’s philosophy as the unique flavour of Manx Loaghtan sheep largely comes from them feeding on the wild grasses and herbs that surround them, as well as locally grown whole grains. It has been a long journey for George and his wife, and talented photographer, Diana, who have fought hard to save the Loaghtan sheep from extinction and bring the numbers of sheep for meat to a viable level but this hard work was rewarded when the Manx Loaghtan sheep was awarded PDO status in 2008. Over time, as George and Diana expanded their market for Manx Loaghtan produce, demand has grown, not surprisingly from mainland Britain. As a result George has moved his livestock over to the Grandborough Fields, where they now run The Lost Farm which rears ‘forgotten’ breeds including the Manx Loaghtan Sheep. This has allowed him to continue to market the Manx Loaghtan to the Isle of Man, while promoting its wonderful history and unique flavour across the UK.

The challenges that George is facing producing Manx Loaghtan Sheep
The  main  challenge  George  faces  is  educating  the  buying  public  that  there  are  alternatives  to  commercial  meat  and  that  using  forgotten  breeds  highlights the  real  quality  of  pure  breeding  and old  traditional  breeds .

Products that George is offering:
George offers a range of Manx Loaghtan sheep cuts and produce from sausages and minced meat to a range of joints. He also has a  variety of traditional breeds of beef which include Highland Cattle, Dexter and Longhorn.

George’s favourite Manx Loaghtan sheep recipe:
A Steriopulos favourite is 4 hour slow roast shoulder of lamb.

Take a shoulder of Manx Loaghtan with the shank left on. This will weigh about 3 kilos and feed between 6 -8 people depending on appetites .

With some fresh garlic, rosemary and oregano placed inside the meat, placed into a roasting dish and coat generously with some good quality olive oil . Then sprinkle some black  pepper  over the meat. Cover with some tin foil, don’t forget shiny side facing the meat, then place in  the oven at 160 C .

After 2 hours remove the foil and continue roasting. After 3 hours add  some  roughly cut vegetables, carrots, sweet  peppers, onion, potatoes, celery are idea to the bottom of the pan  and stir in with the juices .

After 4 hours turn off the oven and let the meat rest. You won’t need to carve it, it falls apart and the kids love the crunchy bits .

Its then ready. What a meal to cook for a Sunday and enjoy with a fine bottle of wine (or  two) .

Contact details:
Address: Woodbine Farm, Grandborough Fields, Rugby, CV23 8BA
Phone: 01624 824618
Email: enquiries@manxloaghtan.com
Web: http://www.manxloaghtan.com/
Web: http://www.thelostfarm.com/index.html

 

“Many traditional foods and breeds in Britain have become endangered because they do not fit into the modern industrial food system. For example, the Manx Loagthan, the rare sheep we breed on the Isle of Man, came close to extinction. Many farmers were forced to switch to quicker-growing types due to rising demand for meat. This not only means that the edible biodiversity in Britain is at risk, but also has consequences for the livelihood of small-scale farmers and hence local economies in rural communities.” George Steriopulos 

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